French President, WHO Chair Announces Establishment of WHO Academy

The World Health Organization (WHO) Academy is the World Health Organization’s most advanced lifelong learning center, equipped with the latest innovations in adult learning for global health.

The WHO, backed by France, is now building an academy that will enhance learning through online, face-to-face and combined learning programmes, reaching millions of health workers and others around the world, the news agency reported. AP.

French President Emmanuel Macron and WHO secretary general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in the last week of September started building a multi-million dollar “WHO Academy” to educate health workers in person and virtually, after COVID-19 transformed education systems around the world.

Macron and Tedros took part in the groundbreaking ceremony for the academy’s site in Lyon, a city in southeastern France, ahead of the planned opening of the campus in 2024.

French President Emmanuel Macron, right, speaks with WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus during the opening of the World Health Organization Academy in Lyon, central France, Monday, September 27, 2021. (Photo: Ludovic Marin via AP)

French President Emmanuel Macron, right, speaks with WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus during the opening of the World Health Organization Academy in Lyon, central France, Monday, September 27, 2021. (Photo: Ludovic Marin via AP)

“We need to train health workers from all countries in the world. We need to consolidate primary healthcare in all countries of the world. Don’t assume health problems will go away when the pandemic ends. That’s wrong, but quite the opposite. Thus, training and consolidation of the healthcare system is very important. Academies will play an important role but our development and policies must also do more. That’s important. Don’t forget that,” Macron said.

The WHO Academy hopes to produce 100 “key learning programmes” by 2023 – through online classes – and use virtual reality, educational games and artificial intelligence to help the WHO workforce and healthcare workers and educators globally.

Key programs will include vaccine equivalence for the coronavirus vaccine, universal health insurance and health emergencies which are all key WHO projects.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus speaks during the opening of the World Health Organization Academy in Lyon, central France, Monday, September 27, 2021. (Photo: Denis Balibousevia AP)

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus speaks during the opening of the World Health Organization Academy in Lyon, central France, Monday, September 27, 2021. (Photo: Denis Balibousevia AP)

“We need to find ways to ensure that WHO guidelines are implemented more quickly and deliver faster results. To do this, we must ensure that health workers have access to learning opportunities that will help them apply the latest WHO guidelines and make a real difference in the lives of people who they serve,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO chief.

He also stressed that the pandemic has taught the world how important health workers are.

“The COVID-19 pandemic is a stark reminder of how important healthcare workers are and why they need investment, decent work, up-to-date information, competencies and tools to keep their communities healthy and safe. Global challenges are evolving and so are the ways we learn,” he said. .

The WHO Academy aims to reach millions of people, not just those in the healthcare world, to help keep pace with the pace of scientific change in healthcare.

The academy is led by former French health minister Agnes Buzyn, and France has donated more than $140 million to the project.

The WHO website says the WHO Academy campus in Lyon, France, which is planned for completion in 2024, will reflect WHO’s values ​​and ambitions: to be a smart, accessible, environmentally friendly and interactive facility in the heart of Lyon’s bio-medical district.

The WHO Academy campus is designed to have high-tech spaces for collaborative learning design, educational research and innovation. The campus will also be a center for world-class health emergency simulations that will use the latest technology to enable health workers to sharpen their competencies amid realistic scenarios including mass casualties and disease outbreaks.

As a WHO Member State and an important player in global health, France is a major investor in the development of the Academy, supporting its establishment and infrastructure. This achievement was made possible thanks to the collective action, commitment and financial support of the City of Lyon and the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region, which contributed 25 million euros of the total investment.

The region will own the campus and lease it to the WHO. [my]

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